Working Title/Gallery 3940


Filed in: Showin' Some Love John Kline artist painter etsy Etsy seller

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Showin’ Some Love with John Kline

1. First of all, you look very young in your Etsy profile picture. How old are you exactly?  I am 36. I was blessed and cursed with a baby face.

2. You work with a lot of different mediums. What medium do you like to work with most?  Recently, I’ve painting with gouache paint, but my favorite medium is oil. I like the range of viscosity and mixing of the paint you can accomplish.

3. If you pressed play right now on your iPod/iPhone/MP3 player what song would be playing?  I really dig the musician Tycho right now. His music is electronic - laid back and ethereal. I like his song “Hours.”

4. Your work has great range. Is there a particular subject you love most to paint?  I’ve been painting a lot of mountains recently. I am usually in awe when in the presence of mountains. I also enjoy doing portraits. Nothing shows greater character than a person’s face.


5. Can you give a brief bio?  I studied painting, drawing, and printmaking at the University of Missouri. I studied under the great Frank Stank and Bill Hawk. (Gotta give a shout-out to them). I moved to Seattle right before I graduated where I suffered and studied van Gogh and John Keats. I did finally move back, finished school and then moved to Chicago where I spent 6 lonely years. I moved back to Kansas City where I am seeking my Master’s in Art Education. I live with my girlfriend and her 2 kids.

 
6. If you could have a round table discussion with any 4 artists who would you invite and why?  Van Gogh: No other artist was more passionate about art and his paintings evoke that. I have read his letters at least 5 times. David Hockney: He is probably my favorite living artist today. He is a great technical artist. Henri Matisse: His paintings are just appealing. They might look simple, but they are simply beautiful. He was a gentle soul, too. I would also invite Henri Cartier-Bresson, too. He’s my favorite photographer.

 
7. What art do you have on your walls in your home?  Most of the work that hangs in my home are my paintings, but I have some my mom’s non-objective paintings from the 60s up. I have a wood block of Tom Huck’s (one of best print makers in the U.S.) and have a ton of Steve Keene paintings. He works in Brooklyn, NY.  He’s one of best pop artists today, in my opinion.

8. Do you have a website/blog/twitter handle I can post so people know where to find and follow you?

My twitter: twitter.com/johnnysmooth

My Etsy Shop: The Artwork of John Kline











Filed in: Jennifer Johansson Showin' Some Love artist etsy mixed media

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Showin’ Some Love with JenniferJohansson

1. How long have you been a member of Etsy? 
I’ve been a member of Etsy since 2007 and started my Etsy shop in January of 2008. 

2. When did you realize that you were an artist?
I have always been interested in art I have been making artful things since I was a child. I got serious about art in high school. My high school art teachers were so inspiring and helped me to build a strong set of foundational skills. Though I loved art and was very successful, I didn’t see myself becoming a professional artist, so I went off to the college to study Physical Therapy. After struggling through my chemistry courses and loving my art studio, I made the switch to Art Education and have never looked back. 

3. What else do you when you’re not creating the work you sell on Etsy?
Until October of 2011, I was a high school art teacher. After relocating last fall for my husband’s new job, I have been able to focus on my own artwork. I also work part time in a graphic design office and do some substitute teaching in the local school district. 

4. What is your inspiration for the work you create?
I am inspired by interior design, especially Midcentury Modern design. I’ve also always been drawn to pattern and paper. I love to comb through magazines and the scrapbook section at the craft store in search of enticing pattern and color.

 

5. So then if you could have dinner with anyone who would it be? and why?
I would love to meet Ray and Charles Eames, the husband and wife design team responsible for the iconic Eames chairs that they designed in the midcentury modern era. I’d love to hear how they managed to successfully live and work together. 

6. How long does it take from beginning to end to create one of your pieces?
It depends on the size. I can complete a small 4”x4” abstract collage in 45 minutes or so. My large and involved chair pieces can take 8-15 hours. 

7. Why did you decide to join Etsy?
I was making a lot of work and it was cluttering up my house. I wanted an easy and inexpensive way to share and sell my work. 

8. Can you give us a brief bio?
I’m originally from Rockford, Illinois and recently relocated to Carbondale, Illinois with my husband Matthew, who is also an artist. I have BS in Art Education and a Master’s degree in education. For the past thirteen years I taught high school studio art and art history. Now, I spend most of my time making art, and have been participating in art fairs all over the Midwest this summer and fall. 

9. Favorites: book, movie, artist, food, song and/or music?
Its difficult for me to choose just one favorite artist, but I’ll say Wayne Thiebaud. He is a master of color and shadow.

I’ve been reading the “Game of Thrones” book series by George R. R. Martin and have been enjoying watching the HBO series based on them as well.

I love to eat! My husband and I joke that our days are planned around our meals. I am obsessed with runny over easy eggs, cheese (I’ve started to make my own fresh Motzarella! Yum), and anything Mexican. I try hard to utilize as much local and in-season produce as I can.

I’m liking the new Santigold album as well as Bob Dylan’s newest. 

10. Do you have a website/blog I can post so people know where to find you? 
Website: jenniferjohansson.com
Blog: jennifermjohansson.blogspot.com

**And don’t forget her Etsy shop: www.etsy.com/shop/JenniferJohansson


Filed in: matchbookmag.com online magazine featuring my work workingtitle/gallery 3940 etsy for sale august 2012 issue

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I found my work in this awesome little online glossy!  Always great to find that my work is being appreciated!  Free publicity…always a good thing.


Filed in: 2008 35mm Black and White art etsy film for sale light and shadows photography

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Light & Shadows 2 Print Series © 2008 Melissa Martinez Photography


Filed in: vintage sign series vintage signs for sale etsy society6

My latest in my Vintage Sign Series.  Available on Etsy and Society6


Filed in: showin' some love photographer matt schwartz she hit pause studios girls etsy seller artist

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Showin’ Some Love with Matt Schwartz

1. How long have you been a member of Etsy? 3 years

2. When did you realize that you were an artist? I’ve always been one, though the word “artist” has just resonated over the past few years. I’ve always thought of myself as a photographer.

3. What else do you when you’re not creating the work you sell on Etsy? Travel, surf, listen to a ton of music and write.

4. What does the name of your shop “She Hit Pause” mean?  It mean “she” stopped time. I photograph a lot of girls and photography is stopping/pausing time forever. Everyone and everything is perfectly frozen.

5. How did you come up with this name? I originally wrote the line in a song.  I was writing about a girl.

6. How often do you travel to capture this beautiful images/polaroid transfers? I aim to go on 3-4 trips a year. I just went to Costa Rica last month and I am hoping/need to go somewhere in July.

7. Why did you decide to join Etsy?  I met one of the main people who started Etsy at a show in Brooklyn.

8. Can you give a brief bio?  I was born in Brooklyn and lived in Colorado for a while. I am now back in Brooklyn. I started out playing music and just taking polaroids/photos for a hobby. I have been taking and making polaroid transfers for the past 6-7 years. I have worked with Anthropologie, Levis, W Magazine and Nylon. I will be featured in a new book called “Polaroid Love” out in May.

9. What is your favorite destination for surfing? Hmmmm.  Maybe Ecuador

10. Do you have a website/blog, Facebook, and/or Twitter I can post so people know where to find you?  Yes, my site is SheHitPauseStudios.com.  Facebook: Facebook.com/shehitpausestudios and Twitter: Twitter.com/shehitpause


@  2007 Melissa Martinez

Here is another shot of the concrete jungle that is the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City, the Big Apple, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera. As was always the case, I had my camera on hand as I was on set for an editorial photo shoot. This shot was taken from the penthouse of this beautiful boutique hotel called The Roosevelt.

Filed in: New York City manhattan Lower Eastside photography digital Black and White cityscape for sale etsy

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@  2007 Melissa MartinezHere is another shot of the concrete jungle that is the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York City, the Big Apple, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera. As was always the case, I had my camera on hand as I was on set for an editorial photo shoot. This shot was taken from the penthouse of this beautiful boutique hotel called The Roosevelt.

Filed in: Showin' Some Love Kelly Puissegur artist etsy retro whale

Showin’ Some Love with Kelly Puissegur

 

1. How long have you been a member of Etsy?
I have been a member/seller on Etsy for almost 3 years. 


2. When did you realize that you were an artist?
I was always kind of crafty while growing up but I didn’t really develop as an artist until college.  I found that I was more of an expressionist artist.  I enjoy artistic imperfections in my art and the art work of others.  While I may have been a little if-y on the classic techniques of drawing, I had a lot of encouraging teachers which kept me going. I think that’s the key with anything you love to do……find a way to keep doing it.

3. What else do you when you’re not creating the work you sell on Etsy?
I surf, skateboard, take my dogs Kennedy and Winnifred hiking, discover new restaurants, go to the movies, make cheesy short films, and hang out with friends. 

4. What is your inspiration for the work you create?
I keep ideas in my sketchbook so I won’t forget them. When I see a shape, texture, animal, movie, or hear an old country or rap song that inspires me, I use that as the basis for a drawing. But most of the time my work is very intuitive and I just start drawing or painting and see what happens.

Sometimes I draw and then scan my drawings into the computer and make an illustration and sometimes I draw & paint with sharpies, ink, acrylic, and oil directly on a wood panel or skateboard. I frequently change approaches and technique because I get bored easily. I like old, antique weathered things so my color palate tends to be earthy with a lot of brown texture. 


5. How long does it take from beginning to end to create one of your pieces?
It all depends. Sometimes I can finish a piece in a day or sometimes I may start something, leave it and then and come back to it a few months later.

6. Why did you decide to join Etsy?
A friend of mine mentioned Etsy to me while I was working at a job that I hated so I gave it a try. My goal was to quit my job and with a lot of hard work and no sleep I was able to quit within a year.

7. Can you give a brief bio?
I went to Southeastern Louisiana University for my BA in fine arts and to LSU for my masters in fine art. I live in Los Angeles with my husband, son, and two dogs. Making art is my full time job and I love every minute of it. 

8. If you could have dinner with any of the famous peeps that are featured in the pieces you create who would it be? and why? (can be fictional or non-fictional) That’s a tough question. Maybe Jim Jarmusch. I’ve heard many interviews with him and he seems like a really interesting guy. 

9. Favorites: book, movie, artist, food, song and/or music?
I have way too many favorites for all of these but I’ll try to narrow it down
The Rum Diaries and everything by Salinger, Adaptation, Thai, The Duchess and the Duke 

10. Do you have a website/blog? 
www.retrowhale.com/


Finding You, Looking for You Polaroid Set, Playa Nosara, Costa Rica © 2008 Melissa Martinez Photography

Filed in: photography Polaroid film color travel costa rica set of 2 for sale etsy

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Finding You, Looking for You Polaroid Set, Playa Nosara, Costa Rica © 2008 Melissa Martinez Photography

Twin Stained Glass Rose Windows, The Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe, Dallas, Texas © 2004 Melissa Martinez Photography

Filed in: photography film color stained glass windows Dallas Texas fine art for sale etsy

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Twin Stained Glass Rose Windows, The Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe, Dallas, Texas © 2004 Melissa Martinez Photography

Ready for the Show © 2011 Melissa Martinez Photography

Filed in: photography digital color seats for sale etsy

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Ready for the Show © 2011 Melissa Martinez Photography

Anchor Motel, Dallas, Texas ©2011 Melissa Martinez Photography on Society6 and Etsy

Filed in: photography color digital vintage sign Dallas Texas for sale etsy society6

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Anchor Motel, Dallas, Texas ©2011 Melissa Martinez Photography on Society6 and Etsy

Filed in: John Purlia etsy Etsy seller artist photographer

Showin’ Some Love with John Purlia

1.  Why did you decide to join Etsy and how long have you been a member?  I was looking for a good solution to the problem of conducting monetary transactions online. More than that, though, I saw selling on Etsy as an opportunity to broaden my audience and put my art in front of thousands of people who may not otherwise happen upon my website or wander into a gallery to see my work on display.  I opened my Etsy shop a little over three years ago as a convenient storefront for selling my limited edition photos, and other products that have evolved over the last couple of years.  Etsy provided a super easy solution to providing shoppers with a safe and secure way of making purchases. 

2. Can you give a brief bio?  I grew up in Alpine, California, obtained my degree in Computer Science from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and worked for a good long time in high tech developing all kinds of really cool software.  I’m completely untrained in the arts. No MFA, no art classes, no photography training. I did, however, grow up around art. Both of my sisters have degrees in art, and my mom was an accomplished painter and art instructor.  I currently live in an 84 year old home in La Jolla, California that was once owned by a descendant of President Grant (who frequently makes appearances, in plastic form, in my photos).


3. When did you realize that you were an artist?
Hmmmm… I’ve always made art on one level or another since I was a little kid, whether that was building things with Legos or designing software applications for computers and cell phones as an adult.  I suppose I started thinking of myself as an artist about 5 years ago when my photography began to gain recognition and I realized that—from a conceptual standpoint—the images I was creating had a lot in common with the type of art I admire and collected. Over the past 10 to 12 years I’ve built a nice little collection of paintings and drawings from the pop surrealism movement, and I see my work as fitting that same conceptual model, but I use a camera to realize my visions rather than paints or pencils.


4. Is photography your main medium? What other mediums to you experiment in?
Photography is the main medium. I do have a set of paints, brushes, pencils and canvases but I suffer from a bad case of Meticulosis, which is the desire make every single pixel perfect; a curse amongst many engineers.  I doubt I would be able to execute the visions I see in my head with a paintbrush. I like photography—especially digital photography—because it allows my creative process to be iterative (as we’ll get to in a couple of more questions).

As an extension of photography I’ve ventured into making short films and videos using a variety of techniques to create the illusion of a photograph “assembling itself” from nothing. So, from that standpoint, film has increasingly become a secondary medium for expressing my artistic vision, and I’ve included video installations in my last couple of gallery exhibitions. The videos are a fun and inventive way to take the viewer into another narrative realm to better understand the three dimensional aspect of my work, and to learn more about the recurring characters you see in my photos. Most recently, I spent two months working on a stop motion animation version of my latest photograph, “Lola and Lexi ditch Biology, and never return to the Eleanor Roosevelt School for Wayward Girls”, which can be seen on my YouTube channel:

bit.ly/sq8gbn

Lastly, and again to reinforce the no-it’s-not-Photoshop aspect of my work, I frequently include large, elaborate installations at my gallery shows that allow the viewer to look beyond the frame and see firsthand how my staged dioramas are constructed.


5. What is your inspiration for the work you create?
I’m probably most inspired to tell really good stories and present an image that invites the viewer to wonder what’s going on now, what happened before, and what might happen next. I’m a big fan of film and literature, so I see my art as a way to tell a story. But it’s just one scene in the story, so a lot is left to the imagination of the viewer to dig into what they see and fill in the gaps.

There are all kinds of elements of pop culture that have a heavy influence on my work, and no doubt play some kind of subconscious role in inspiring the images I create in my studio. I love old toys, irony, campy monster movies, really good satire, clever lyrics, overlooked indy bands, and just about any kind of vintage advertising—as long as it features fabulously glamorous girls selling ridiculous products like white wall tires or automatic blenders.

6. What is your creative process? Where do you begin?
All of my work for the past three years has ben created inside of a light tent, so I begin inside a stark white empty void. :)

Actually, I usually start with a broad concept tied to either a record album, a book, or a toy figure that I believe has narrative potential. I’ll then try to develop a visual relationship between that object and other source material to establish the basic composition of the piece. Quite often, this means setting up a few quick objects—maybe a record cover and a couple of figures—for a concept photo. If the concept works, I’ll start constructing a stage inside the light tent using records, books, and alphabet blocks set in front of my background source material (usually a record album cover or book). Onto this stage I’ll place the primary objects that establish the storyline, then begin filling in with other figures and objects as the details of narrative begin to emerge in my mind. Along the way, I’ll start taking reference photos that I can analyze on the computer, checking for compositional feel, character relevance, and positioning of each and every object captured in the frame. I take a lot of notes, then go back into the light tent to swap figures in and out, move things around, and make fine tuning adjustments so that every object is right where I want it. This process can go on for quite some time until I’m finally ready to turn on the heavy duty flood lights and capture the one and only shot.

Except… I don’t snap just one shot! Because I’m shooting very small objects spread across a wide target area from fairly close range and want to achieve deep focus throughout my scene, I usually take the same shot at a variety of aperture settings or pointing the autofocus at a variety of objects, and capture a dozen or so candidate images. In post production I select the single image with the best range of focus, and go about making my image adjustments, brushing out unwanted text, retouching scuffs and tears in the vintage album covers (many over 50 years old!), and generally improving the color, vibrancy and image tone to achieve a particular look.

7. How long does it take from beginning to end to create one of your pieces?
Way back when each photo took anywhere from 3 to 5 minutes. I’m not kidding! This was back in 2004 when I first developed my style of combining record covers and toys into a single three dimensional image.  I’d set these up quickly without any thought, snap a picture with my 3 megapixel point’n’shoot, take it down, and move on to the next.  When I started editing these first photos I began to realize the visual and narrative potential behind the images, and I realized that I had hit on something very unique.

As my work has evolved and the stories and stagings have become more complex, the time I spend on each piece has grown. Today, I’ll typically spend two to three weeks on the physical side of each photo, developing the composition, building stage set, adjusting the placement of the figures in the frame, and shooting reference photos. Post product usually adds another four to six days, and coming up with a fitting title… THAT can take weeks!

8. Favorites: book, movie, artist, food?
Oh, now this is too hard! But, I’m game…

Book: Job: A Comedy of Justice by Robert Heinlein (which probably explains a lot about my photography)
Movie: For today, it will be North By Northwest, but tomorrow it will be something else, like Dr. Strangelove or Mulholland Drive.
Artist: Mark Ryden
Food: My mom’s stew with homemade dumplings

9. What is your website/blog so people know where to find you?

JohnPurlia.com
YouTube
Facebook
@johnpurlia on Twitter
Flickr

And of course you can buy, see, and purchase one of John’s oddly unique and beautiful portraits on Etsy!